1-770-720-1847 monteen@hawktalk.org
Hawk Talk
Call Hawk Talk 1-770-720-1847

Thank you for visiting HawkTalk.Org

Call us at 1-770-720-1847 to discuss hawk rescue.  We care for raptors (birds of prey) that cannot be released back to the wild.

We also rehabilitate hawks, owls, eagles, kites, falcons and ospreys.

We need Mouse Money!

You can also help out by visiting smile.amazon.com.  They will donate to us based on purchases that you make and it doesn’t cost you anything.

We are a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization located in North Georgia providing hawk rescue and care for other raptors (birds of prey) including owls, eagles, falcons and osprey.hawk rescue and owl rehabilitation

We operate our facility based on donations from caring people who, for one reason or another, aren’t in the position to be rehabbers themselves, but are interested in and dedicated to the preservation and protection of raptors.

We also do off site programs for schools, nature centers, scouts, birthday parties, public displays, etc.  This is done on a fee basis. Please call for details!

Hacking for hawk rescue or owl rehabilitation.

Hacking is an old falconry technique that is literally, thousands of years old. Hacking (AKA soft release) is how we re-introduced the Golden Eagle back to the Cumberland Plateau in northwest Georgia, the American Bald eagle to the Lake Allatoona area north of Atlanta and the Peregrine Falcon in downtown Atlanta.  We can help you with this procedure or provide it as a service.
For more information, see our blog post on Hacking Orphaned Hawks and Owls.

Here’s what we have going at Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons
Little minkey

These tube like things (feather sheaths) coming out from the cere and beak are called rictal bristles - sort of like whiskers on a cat - very sensitive to touch. When their eyes are closed and the parents bring food, they will trill as an audible alert and touch the food to these developing bristles which alerts the babe that luncheon is served and open goes the mouth. 🙂
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Little minkey

These tube like things (feather sheaths) coming out from the cere and beak are called rictal bristles - sort of like whiskers on a cat - very sensitive to touch. When their eyes are closed and the parents bring food, they will trill as an audible alert and touch the food to these developing bristles which alerts the babe that luncheon is served and open goes the mouth. :)
Bubbies... ... See MoreSee Less
Bubbies...

Comment on Facebook

I wouldn’t but I really WANT to kiss their heads 😊

Looked scared

So cute

It was never in the cards for me to bear children or mother them, or raise them, instead my ability to nurture lends itself to the feathered and furred.

God save you all, my sweet little animal family...
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Comment on Facebook

Thank you for being a mother of raptors. They needed your warrior energy to care and protect them.

This very much counts as being a mother...just as much as if mother to an step child....your work is so important...and so needed...Happy Mothers Day

And bless you for all you do🙏

You have mothered so many! Love you.

You are a mom to many feathered creatures. ❤️

Have a great day Mother Raptor!

Me too...animals need human moms too. Happy Mother’s Day

View more comments

This map shows the movement of an eagle for a period of twenty years. He had installed the tracker in Russia and finally died twenty years later in the Child Valley in Saudi Arabia. It is very interesting to see how far this eagle has come in its twenty years of life and the great distances it has traveled in many countries.

Also what is interesting to note is the way he avoids crossing the sea. You can clearly see where the longest route was, just to keep flying over land. Many species of birds spend their whole lives flying over the sea, but one thing is for sure, and that is that this eagle certainly avoided crossing the sea.

Nature is amazing!
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This map shows the movement of an eagle for a period of twenty years. He had installed the tracker in Russia and finally died twenty years later in the Child Valley in Saudi Arabia. It is very interesting to see how far this eagle has come in its twenty years of life and the great distances it has traveled in many countries. 

Also what is interesting to note is the way he avoids crossing the sea. You can clearly see where the longest route was, just to keep flying over land. Many species of birds spend their whole lives flying over the sea, but one thing is for sure, and that is that this eagle certainly avoided crossing the sea.

Nature is amazing!Image attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

That is incredible!

He cant feed when hes out on the sea and his feathers are probably not designed for big humidity and contant rains

Katy Stephens Manley

Tyler Benowitz

Do you know the years he was tracked? Just curious if the conflict on the Ukraine border kept him from staying on that trek all those years. Seems it would have been an easy “over land” excursion.

Anna Amador

That really cool. Sad to see that it it died but seems like a long life

Tonija Kekez

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Another youngster renested!!! ... See MoreSee Less
Another youngster renested!!!

Comment on Facebook

Spring myst be your busiest time of year?

Quick update on the tater tots! ... See MoreSee Less
Nature at its finest! ... See MoreSee Less
Nature at its finest!
Lamb Chop cat head...

If you would like to help us keep mice on the table for our tiny wildlife ministry, please visit out web site hawktalk.org and click on the Paypal link which will take you to a safe and secure page.

Or you can just click on PayPal to make a donation and the email associated with our charity is - monteen@hawktalk.org

AND if you're hinky about electronic donating in general, you can snail mail funds to:

HawkTalk
Monteen McCord
P.O. Box 130
Holly Springs, GA 30142

Thank you and enjoy these precious babies that I will be hacking out if we can't find a foster home.
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Comment on Facebook

Also, a quick reminder. Hawk Talk, Inc. is one of the charities eligible for Amazon Smile selection. I may not have a lot of funds to donate, but Hawk Talk has been my Smile charity for some while.

Oops...I had posted this twice and deleted the first one. Thanks for your 'likes'...

You have great puppet skillz!!

Clever and simple idea with the cardboard. They’re looking good and healthy.💗 Thanks for shout out! 🤩 It’s a pleasure to be a volunteer “Wildlife Animal Uber” for WRENCertified.org 🙌

Message this morning from the nice man at the golf club that facilitated the release of the GHOW foster baby!

Good morning, just wanted to give you an update. The bird you brought over has perched about 30 feet up a tree and the mother is still feeding it because there is a ton of bird droppings below the tree the one, the baby in the basket is getting really big and has a full mask mama is still taking care of them both.
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